Jams, Morabbas, Squashes and Sauces II

(Contd. from previous posting)

We had seen some general notes on jam making in our previous posting. Before we proceed to the recipes, let me also make it clear the following:

I had already stressed that it is easy to manage small quantities in cooking always and this holds good here also. Larger quantities require longer time to prepare which means loss of nutrients, flavour, darkening and improper end result.

Normally I advise fresh vegetables or fruits but if unavoidable, you can use frozen ones but the result may not be matching the one made out of fresh ones.

For jellying, never adopt slow boiling but fast rapid boiling only. Pectin, which thickens the jelly, gets destroyed if the juice is boiled slowly.

Never use wet ladle or spoon or hand directly. It will cause moulding or fermenting as a result of which it has to be discarded.

Sometimes jams or jellies become thin, soft and runny. This means that you need to thicken it. This can be done by just heating 1 or 2 cups of similar or neutral fruit juice (grape, apple etc) to boiling, pouring and stirring till the desired consistency is reached. Alternately you can increase the quantity of pectin through trial and error method (say 20% more to begin with) if it was used, or by adding it in the recipe as per the nature of pectin (dry or liquid and as directed on the packet). Instead you can also boil it completely for just one minute while stirring it.

If too thick reduce pectin in similar fashion or add a little more juice before cooking next time.

Citric acid crystals as well as sugar in addition to the natural preservatives in the fruit juice are sufficient. Yet, for best result, we need to use preservatives like Sodium Benzoate or Potassium Meta-bi-sulphite. These will be available in any good food stores or chemical shops. In these, Sodium Benzoate is a good preservative for pickles also.

Now let us begin with the procedure:

Mango Jam I

Preparation time: 1 hour Shelf life: 1 year  

Ingredients

 

Full ripe , fresh mango pulp

Just ripening fresh fruit pulp

Sugar

Citric acid crystals

Mango essence

Food colour

(Tartrazine yellow or green)

Sodium Benzoate

 

750 gems

250 gems

1 kg

1 tsp

3 ml

½ tsp

 

½ tsp

 

Fresh firm ripe and just ripening Mangoes 

Method

If fruit pulp is readily available you can skip the procedure to make the pulp.

Whenever you select fruits for jams or jellies, select ripe and fresh fruits but not too ripened ones. The fruits should be firm. Similarly select some just ripening fruits since these contain more pectin than the ripen varieties.

Wash the fruits well to remove mud, external impurities and dirt. Wipe with a clean cloth. Cool dry. Peel the skin. Cut the fruits with knife into pieces and deseed. Keep the pieces in a large vessel and smash into pulp. Measure these and add equivalent quantity of sugar. Mix well and heat. Constantly keep stirring. If you think that the contents are too thick to boil of their own accord, you may add a little water as deemed fit but do not add too much water. When it starts boiling add citric acid crystals and continue stirring. When it leaves the side by not sticking to the side and clear more or less, put off the fire and remove. Add the colour, essence and the preservative. Stir well and pour the hot jam in sterilized airtight jars and when cool seal the lid tightly. Store in a cool place or refrigerate.

 

Mango Pulp

Mango Jam II

 Preparation time: 1 hour Shelf life: 1 year  

Ingredients

 

Full ripe , fresh mango pulp

Sugar

Citric acid crystals

Pectin (dry)

Food colour (Tartrazine yellow)

Potassium Meta-bi-sulphite

 

250 gms

250 gms

¼ tsp

1 tsp

1 ml

¼ tsp

 

Method

If fruit pulp is readily available you can skip the procedure to make the pulp.

Wash the fruits well to remove mud, external impurities and dirt. Wipe with a clean cloth. Cool dry. Peel the skin. Cut the fruits with knife into pieces and deseed. Keep the pieces in a large vessel and smash into pulp. Measure these and add equivalent quantity of sugar. Mix well and heat. Constantly keep stirring. If you think that the contents are too thick to boil of their own accord, you may add a little water as deemed fit but do not add too much water. When it leaves the side by not sticking to the side and clear more or less, put off the fire and remove. Dissolve citric acid, pectin and potassium meta-bi-sulphite in ¼ cup of hot water and mix it in the jam well. Pour the hot jam in sterilized airtight jars and when cool seal the lid tightly. Store in a cool place or refrigerate.

Mango jams

(To conclude)

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